Home — Murder, “cold” cases, and mayhem

This website is intended to deal with murder, brutality, corruption and hatred—all falling under what we call acts of injustice.  We tell the stories of open and unsolved homicides–what are called “cold” cases.  We also memorialize those whose lives have been taken from them in hope that somebody will come forward to tell the truth. So far our efforts center on Michigan.

David B. Schock, Ph.D.

David B. Schock, Ph.D.

“Somebody knows somethin’.  Somebody ALWAYS knows somethin’.”

That’s the way Jim Fairbanks put it when we made our first film, Who Killed Janet Chandler?  Detective Fairbanks (retired) was the lead investigator on the law enforcement team in 1979.  What he had to say then still applies today.  For nearly every unsolved homicide there is somebody out there who could solve it if she or he would come forward and make a contact.

To call an unsolved homicide a “cold” case is chilling in its own right.  Yes, these unsolved cases grow “cold” because there are no new leads; they more or less drop off the social and cultural radar.  But they are NEVER “cold” to the family members and friends, they are never forgotten or out of mind.  And there is always the hope that justice, however delayed, will be served.

We invite you to visit the We Remember part of this site, a place where families and friends of those whose murders remain unsolved contact us and can help to post details of the victims’ lives and the resultant investigations.

We also invite your view of what we are calling a Primary Documentary Investigation as we tell the story of the murder of Mina Dekker.

Our hope in all the cases we chronicle is that somebody who knows something will say something.

 

From David — A Weblog of investigation:

April 17, 2019 — The swear-to hearing

The day after the press conference, I filed a Freedom of Information Act request with Eaton County seeking information about the arrest warrants. I wanted to know more of the story. It was denied in large part and only the arrest complaints were granted. That was something. What I SHOULD HAVE asked for was a copy of the swear-to hearing that outlined much of the crime directly from the court. I’ve been schooled, thank you very much. And here it is. This is what I was after:

Note the start and end times: 5-5:16 p.m. It sure looks like this hearing was intended to be out of the public view. The court closes its doors at 5 p.m. Is there a compelling reason for all this to be in secret? That’s up to the prosecutor and judge to explain. There was only one person giving testimony, Detective James Maltby, and he worked for the county, so he could have been ordered to appear just about any time.

Doing the people’s business in secret is not doing the people’s business.

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April 17, 2019 — Oh, this begins to tell the story

Lansing State Journal reporter Kara Berg has really done her job. Here is the beginning of the story of what happened.

Here is the victim, the son of teachers, a father, and allegedly murdered by his wife, stepdaughter, and her friend.

 Roberto Higüey Alejandro Caraballo, 37

The idea that Roberto Caraballo was still alive when a plastic bag was put over his head to suffocate him…. When I made the film investigators gave that as one possibility. The other was the there was so much blood that it had to be caught. Much more to come.

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April 15, 2019 — A day in court this Friday for Mr. McMillan

Christopher Wayne McMillan will be in Eaton County Circuit Court April 19 (scheduled for 8:30 a.m.) for a status conference. This may be routine, but one never knows. According to his attorney, John Deming, he is unlikely to be there to allocute.

Mr. McMilland is accused of murdering (homicide–open murder), conspiring to murder, and mutilating the body of Roberto Higüey Alejandro Caraballo on or about May 7, 2002. His bail was set at $1 million and he is now in the custody of the Eaton County Jail. He is changed with co-defendants Beverly McCallum and her daughter Dineane Ducharme. Ms. DuCharme is being extradited from a jail in Texas. Ms. McCallum is in the wind, perhaps in Pakistan, according to Sheriff Tom Reich in his presser of April 4.

Mr. McMillan comes to circuit court after waiving his right to a preliminary hearing in district court.

The arrest warrants for the three were issued November 7 of last year. How long has he been in custody? The officer at the booking desk in the county jail indicates that he has been there since November 8, the day after the warrants were issued. So, about five months, a long time. And it wasn’t until a reporter for the Lansing State Journal, Kara Berg, came across the case, that the matter was brought to light, perhaps as a result of her noting that on March 26 the court scheduled the status conference in a murder case, previously unremarked.

Mr. McMillan allegedly was in Charlotte when Mr. Caraballo was murdered (police have determined the crime scene there). Most recently he has been living in Grand Rapids. His facebook page indicates that he came there from San Augustine, Texas. He is quite a piece of work as his page reveals.

There is a notice on his arrest complaint that his DNA is on file from a previous case. I am sure all that will be forthcoming.

So, this Friday is Good Friday.

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April 5, 2019 — The presser and such

Here is the Fox 17 account of the presser.

It is probably the best one. Channel 8 had audio troubles and then some. There are as well lot and lots of stories out there.

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April 4, 2019 — “Jack in the Box” apparently solved

It has taken roughly 17 years since the crime. And now reporters are learning that the “Jack in the Box” case is likely solved. In the first place, there was always the lack of knowledge of Jack’s identity. He is Roberto Higüey Alejandro Caraballo, a native of the Dominican Republic. He was 37 at the time of his murder.

Here are some initial reports:

The Lansing State Journal.

WLNS

And there is a press conference scheduled for today in Eaton County. There is a lot of information that will come out, much of it slowly. But the question some of you have had was this: did the film have anything to do with the solution of the crime? It’s my understanding it did. But the real and ongoing work is the result of two detectives in particular. But that is likely their story to share.

My idea was that I needed to keep Jack’s story out in public, just in case. This relates to my concept of these murder films—and I’ve now made six feature-length films of this kind; of that number, five have been solved. While I am very happy to entertain an audience, I am really reaching out for the ONE person who can tell the police what they need to prosecute the case.

We know that in the early stages of a murder investigation time is the enemy. But once a case grows cold, time can be an ally; people grow consciences, get religion, have kids, think about what they’ve done, are freed from fear of retaliation. Anything can happen, and time is your friend.

But 17 years???

It takes as long as it takes.

And we need to remember Roberto for who he was. In addition to victim, he was a beloved family member. Remember THAT man through all the flash of the news.

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